Lions facing an uphill battle against St Pat’s

Craig Johnson and the Dubbo Lions will be hoping for an improved showing at Bathurst on Saturday. Photo: CHERYL BURKE Andrew Murrell and the Dubbo Lions will be determined to turn their seasona round at Bathurst on Saturday. Photo: CHERYL BURKE
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THE Dubbo Lions have had little to cheer about so far in 2016 and on Saturday they face another challenge when they make the trip to Bathurst.

Following last week’s 5-2 loss to the Orange Wanderers the Lions meet second-placed St Pat’s.

The Bathurst side have been in fine form this season, losing just two of eight matches so far, and the only thing keeping them from the top of the ladder is the fact they lost four points due to playing an unregistered player.

The Lions were also dealt that punishment and it put them on the bottom of the ladder, somewhere they remain.

Despite being winless, their one win in the opening round was stripped as punishment, there have been positive signs for the Dubbo side.

On Saturday they will be desperate to show improvement again as they look to make up for the embarrassment of last time they met St Pat’s.

The Bathurst side dominated that match back in mid-April, winning 12-0 and coach Graeme Waters will be determined to avoid that kind of score this time out.

Matt Waters and Stuart McKenzie will again be key after finding themselves on the scoresheet numerous times this season.

The action at Bathurst gets underway at 1.35pm.

Elsewhere, Orange Wanderers are looking to build on last week’s win over the Lions when they take on Lithgow Zig Zag.

The Wanderers won comfortably last week and now face two crunch games.

Player-coach Matt Johnson said wins in the next two matches will keep them within reach of the top two on the ladder.

Despite dominating the game against Dubbo, Johnson wants to see his side still play better against Zig Zag.

“They’ve been flying under the radar a bit,” Johnson said of the Lithgow team.

“We’re going back to our basics. Our passing and trapping probably wasn’t up to scratch against Dubbo, if we can execute our basics the rest should take of itself.”

In the women’s PLH, the Dubbo Blue Jays enjoy the bye.

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Christmas rose great for winter

The Christmas rose, helleborus niger, is so called because in the northern hemisphere where it originated it blooms over Christmas.
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Comfrey is great for the compost heap.

It is not a rose but its white flowers resemble a single rose.

DELICATE: The helleborus niger is not a rose but its white flowers resemble a single rose.

It grows best in a shaded place where the soil is deep and contains much humus and moisture.

Plant it where you might grow ferns and protect it from strong winter winds.

The best time to plant a Christmas rose is in autumn. A common mistake is to plant it too late in spring.

Unless planted well before this, it will not build up enough reserve energy to enable it to bloom the following winter.

Christmas roses must not be planted too deep and special care must be taken that the roots are not damaged.

Plant them so that the crown is no more than two or three centimetres below the soil surface.

A plant will last for many decades so the soil must be well prepared with humus. Leaf mould and peat moss can be dug in too. Only very old and well-rotted manure should be used.

The soil should be about neutral rather than acid.

Christmas roses here can bloom any time from May to August, depending on weather conditions.

Comfrey

Comfrey is a very tenacious plant. Once you have it in your garden you will have much trouble in getting rid of it.

It is rich in calcium, phosphorus, potassium and trace minerals and in vitamins A and C.

Comfrey has long been used medicinally for all sorts of ailments, both internally and externally.

But medical experts now believe that excessive internal use can cause irreversible liver damage and say it should be taken very sparingly, or better still not at all.

But there’s one good thing about comfrey. It’s great for the compost heap.

Conifers

Conifers, as we all know, come in all shapes, sizes and many colours.

The most familiar ones range from shrubs to gigantic trees.

Not so well known is the fact that there are many which are low growing ground covers, and these can give you year-round colour.

Most ornamental conifers belong to two families, juniper and cypress.

You’ll be bewildered by the botanical names on conifer plants in garden centres.

If you’re looking for ground covers watch out for junipers with the names horizontalis, depressa or prostrata.

Juniperus communis depressa aurea is a good example.

It spreads outward with curved branches drooping at the tip. It changes colour charmingly throughout the season. It starts with bright gold in spring, fades to green and gold for summer and then takes on beautiful silver purplish hues, flecked with bronze, for winter. It will thrive in poor soil.

For a fast grower try juniperus horizontalis douglasii. It is steel blue in summer, purple in winter and has stiffish, spreading branches.

Even more attractive is juniperus horizontalis glauca, which grows closer to the ground and has blue berries. It is blue-green.

All of these plants are not fussy about soil or even about rainfall.

Jobs to do

Many areas can expect frost from now on. Any pumpkins that are still outdoors should be brought in and stored in a dry place.

Remember not to lift them by their stems and don’t let them touch each other on the shelf.

Perennials such as delphiniums and foxgloves should have their dead stalks cut off and removed. Fork in some dolomite around them and bed them down for winter with a mulch of hay.

You can also dig up perennials now and divide them, unless you are in a very cold area, in which case leave them until spring.

Kitchen herbs can be divided or planted out. Thyme, sage and marjoram can be split up. So can chives.

Conifers come in all shapes and sizes.

Bring in pumpkins and store.

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Natural disaster cash grants sought to help relieve dairy farmer pressures

ADF President Simone Jolliffe and Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce in Victoria this week after discussing the federal government’s response to the dairy price cut crisis.
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AUSTRALIAN Dairy Farmers are asking government to adjust the eligibility criteria for $20,000 in cash grants that normally aid communities hit by natural disasters like floods and fires, to support embattled dairy farmers impacted by the shock milk price cut crisis.

ADF President Simone Jolliffe welcomed various support measures promoted by different groups to promote support dairy farmers this week including banks easing debt pressures and financial assistance by State governments.

Ms Jolliffe was one of several industry leaders and dairy farmers who met for talks this week with Agriculture and Water Resources Minister Barnaby Joyce near Shepparton in Victoria, to address a response package.

Ms Jolliffe said support measures from the major banks and State governments had been declared but federal government grants remained a core priority.

She said a verbal request was made to Mr Joyce this week to amend the eligibility criteria for disaster relief assistance to provide $5000 grants for professional business advice for farmers suffering the heaviest impacts of the price cut crisis.

That request also applied to $15,000 cash grants that can be provided to assist immediate recovery efforts for dairy farmers which are normally issued for community support following extreme weather events.

Ms Jolliffe said the support package also needed to be bipartisan and she would speak to Shadow Agriculture Minister Joel Fitzgibbon, and Mr Joyce, in understanding the caretaker conventions of government due to the federal election.

“ADF is extremely welcoming of any support that can assist those dairy farmers who have been impacted by these unplanned price cuts by milk processors,” she said.

“We are using our own resources to assist farmers at this time but we also need more federal government assistance to support those most heavily impacted, including fast-tracking Farm Household Allowance.

“We also need to amend the criteria for concessional loans and to help with access to cash grants that are provided to communities hit unexpectedly by natural disasters like floods and fires that help them with recovery efforts.”

Ms Jolliffe said improving resources to strengthen the delivery of Rural Financial Counselling Services for the dairy industry, was also a priority.

She said about 4000 of the nation’s 6100 dairy farmers were impacted by Murray Goulburn’s retrospective price cuts which were followed by Fonterra and the exact number of businesses needing the cash grants was still being determined.

After this week’s meeting near Shepparton, which included Health Minister Sussan Ley and Regional Development and Health Minister Fiona Nash, Mr Joyce said various measures were being considered, to implement an assistance package.

That included resources to assist effected farmers with managing paperwork on Farm Household Allowance applications.

Mr Joyce said he would also talk to the Finance Minister about changing the criteria for delivering concessional loans, at a cheaper rate.

“We have access to a quarter of $1 billion per year which we got through the White Paper and concessional loans so let’s see if we can make more of that available to people in the dairy industry,” he said.

Mr Joyce said dairy industry members had promised to provide him with a statement on their support requirements after the meeting which Ms Jolliffe said was due early next week.

“There are a couple of other issues that we said we are going off-line with to make sure that we get a result,” he said.

“We are already working towards the solution right now – we will be continuing on with the solution.”

The Nationals leader said the snap milk price reduction would be “more widely felt later on” but was currently concentrated on Fonterra and Murray Goulburn.

However, he stressed there was a strong global outlook for the dairy industry which he said was not suffering a “systemic downturn”.

“It’s got a short-term problem and we will find our way through this and we will continue on,” he said.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is also looking into the circumstances underpinning the milk price cuts as is the Australian Securities & Investments Commission.

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Police urged to re-investigate Sharron Phillips murder

Believed murdered: Sharron Phillips. Photo: SuppliedPolice are being urged to re-investigate the 1986 disappearance and suspected murder of Brisbane woman Sharron Phillips, as new allegations continue to emerge.
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Police Commissioner Ian Stewart said cost would not impact a decision to reopen a cold-case investigation where life had been lost.

That comes despite comments from a senior cold case officer on Thursday, who said land next to the Phillips’ household might prove too costly to search.

Commissioner Stewart said he would need to consider suspicions raised by members of the Phillips family, and was happy to take their views into account.

He said there was a cold case process, and no decision had yet been made whether to reopen the case.

He would not comment on whether the investigation had been botched, despite suggestions the alibi of Bob Phillips may not have been corroborated.

Bob Phillips’ eldest siblings on Friday questioned his father’s alibi, saying he did not own a truck in 1986.

They did not accuse him of Sharron’s murder but want aspects of the 30-year-case re-examined.

Mr Phillips told police he went to Gilgandra to pick up “one of our trucks”, returning by “4am or 5am”, when Sharron disappeared.

The minimum time to complete the would be 17 hours.

A second retired homicide detective David Danslow, who took over the case from detective Bob Dallow in 1994, said there was nothing on the police file questioning Mr Phillips’ alibi.

“All the statements I read had Bob and Dawn going down to TNT in Brisbane and then going down to New South Wales, Gilgandra or something like that,” Mr Danslow said.

However Mr Danslow – who retired in 2015 – said he had not seen any corroborating statements on the police file about the trip to Gilgandra to collect a truck.

“Look I will keep an open mind about everything, but I would really be surprised if Bob Phillips has killed his daughter.

“Well, it was never done then. Believe me there were a lot of things that should have been done, that probably didn’t happen back then.”

Mr Danslow said there was no reason to suspect Mr Phillips.

“I have never seen anything to implicate the family,” he said.

“The family were the greatest critics of the police and always up the police almost every day.”

Mr Danslow questioned the need to search the block of land near the family house at Riverview without direct evidence.

He doubted the land had ever been searched.

“I would suspect not, because there was never anything to implicate the family,” he said.

The ability to reinvestigate can be impeded by time, Commissioner Stewart said.

“But on the upside, we have a whole raft of technology in our favour.

“Cost is rarely an issue.”

Fairfax Media is aware investigations by detectives into the Sharron Phillips the case are now active.

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Officer kicked in the face during ‘AVO breach’ arrest

VIOLENT ARREST: Extra police from Armidale were called to back up officers during the operation in Glen Innes. Photo: Craig ThomsonA MAN has been refused bail, charged with kicking a police officer in the face during a violent arrest in Glen Innes.
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Richard William Fields will remain in custody in Tamworth Correctional Centre on six charges following a police operation earlier this week.

The 33-year-old is accused of threatening police who were investigating an alleged breach of an apprehended violence order in Glen Innes on Tuesday night.

Extra police, including officers from the Dog Squad, highway patrol and detectives, were deployed to Glen Innes on Wednesday to back up general-uties police who moved into arrest Fields in West Ave.

Police allege Fields was armed with a lump of wood when he walked out into the front yard of a home and then allegedly kicked the officer and resisted police, but was eventually subdued and taken to Glen Innes Police Station.

“There was a struggle when he was arrested and he allegedly assaulted a male officer in the face,” New England Inspector Chris McKinnon said.

“The officer suffered lacerations and bruising to his face, and was taken to Glen Innes hospital and later released.”

Following a Telstra outage in Glen Innes, which saw a loss of phone and internet communications, Fields was transported to Armidale Police Station and questioned.

He was charged with breaching an AVO, intimidating police, ass- aulting police causing actual bodily harm, two counts of resisting arrest and being armed with intent.

He appeared in Armidale Local Court on Thursday, but the bail determination was ad- journed following outbursts from the accused and members of the public in the courtroom.

On Friday, Fields appeared via video link from Tamworth prison in court, where he was denied bail by Magistrate Michael Holmes, who found the 33-year-old was an unacceptable risk of committing further serious offences and endangering the safety of victims, individuals and the community.

Fields pleaded not guilty to all six charges and was remanded in custody to reappear in court later this month.

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Memories found in hideaway drawer tell a fascinating story

WAR WORDS: Melinda Gill and Jan Morris with the World War II signed banner cloth discovered in a bottom drawer at the local historical society office in Tamworth. Photo: Gareth Gardner 100516GGA01HISTORY often offers up coincidences of a spooky kind, but a search this month through the historical records in Tamworth collided in a happy stroke of luck.
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The fluke has resulted in a wonderful windfall for the Tamworth Historical Society and uncovered a piece of our history that really does echo some old stories of the social fabric of the city.

On the same day that the society was reaching out to The Leader to help find anyone with details about a missing war relic, by sheer chance another society member found some unnamed and unknown objects in a hideaway drawer.

When Melinda Gill turned up at the society’s workday office last week, she had with her something she’d uncovered in a bottom drawer.

She didn’t know what it was, but when she handed it to another researcher, Jan Morris, Mrs Morris nearly fainted with surprise.

“It was just the most amazing coincidence,” Mrs Morris said.

THEN: A 2/30th Battalion march down Peel St probably around 1940 and from historical records.

“I didn’t have any inkling but as soon as I saw the wrapped piece in Melinda’s hands, I just knew exactly what it might be. I’d spent since February trying to track down details about it, and just as we’re talking about a story to find anyone with any information about it, Melinda turns up with it.

“I couldn’t stop smiling.”

The Morris search began last February after an old typed sheet referred to a pennant made in June 1940 when the Tamworth showground was commandeered as a training camp for the 2nd Australian Infantry Force.

A battalion was formed there under the command of Colonel William S Forsythe.

SHOW PARADE: Another 2/30th Battalion image and what is most likely taken on the Tamworth showground.

Mrs Morris says her re- search discovered that a Mr AH Daniel of Tamworth, who’d been a veteran of World War I, re-enlisted as pioneer sergeant on the camp staff and his wife embroidered a pennant which centred a beautifully executed large replica of the Australian Army badge and the words “Australian Commonwealth Military Forces”.

“Sergeant Daniel subsequently procured the signatures, on the flag, of a large number of the officers, NCOs, and men who were in camp at the showground, many of whom later served in the Middle East, Malaya, and the south west Pacific area,” Mrs Morris said.

“Later, after the Second World War, Mr and Mrs Daniel presented the pennant to Colonel Forsythe, who decided that its permanent repository should be in the War Memorial Town Hall at Tamworth.”

A subsequent and thorough search of council re- cords and collections fail- ed to find the pennant, or any reference to it.

And an appeal to Tamworth RSL Museum manager Bob Chapman showed he’d never seen it but he had a keen interest in adding it to his collection if it was found.

ATTENTION: This image from The NDL files is believed to have been taken at the showgrounds during the days of the training camp.

So, just as the society was asking The Leader to publicise the lost relic it turned up, but the society is just as keen to find any remaining family members or anyone who knows more about the story of the pennant.

You might also call it a flag or a banner it was, after all, stored with tablecloths in that long lost drawer.

Along with other names are army numbers and in some places, place names. Ten 10 are from Tamworth, but there are many from other North West and Northern Rivers towns, as well as Newcastle, Sydney, interstate and even England and Scotland, which might be birthplaces.

Robert McKenzie Fraser, George Hume Henry, Sergeant Roy Somerville and Thomas Sholto Douglas were among a few who listed Tamworth alongside their names.

The Tamworth Historical Society would love to hear from anyone who has more information or from family members of those involved.

Phone Jan Morris on 6765 9478.

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Shotgun, drugs seized in Dungowan raid

UNDER THE BED: The illegal shotgun which police allegedly found hidden in the Ogunbil Rd home at Dungowan. 200516BCA01AN ILLEGAL shotgun, as well as more than $100,000 worth of drugs, have been seized in a police raid near Tamworth.
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A tip-off to Crime Stoppers triggered the search warrant at Ogunbil Rd in Dungowan on Thursday afternoon, which saw a team of officers from Oxley detectives and the Tamworth Target Action Group comb the property, home and surrounding sheds.

During the search, police discovered more than 10kg of what is believed to be cannabis leaf, as well as 14 cannabis plants and Oxley Acting Inspector Geoff Sharpe told The Leader the drugs have an estimated street value of $118,000.

“A 47-year-old male occupant, was spoken to at that address. He then assisted police in relation to that search,” he said.

BUSTED: Fourteen cannabis plants, pictured, along with more than 10kg of what is believed to be cannabis leaf was seized during the Dungowan raid. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth 200516BCA05

“A firearm, an unregistered shotgun, was located underneath the bed inside theresidence.”

The man was arrested and taken to Tamworth Police Station, where he was questioned by investigators and charged with six offences.

“Police allege he made full admissions to the cultivation of the plants, possession of the leaf, and he was charged in relation to supply cannabis and cultivate plants and possession of an unauthorised firearm and ammunition,” Acting Inspector Sharpe said.

The man was released on conditional bail to front court next month.

The firearm – the fourth illegal gun seized since Tuesday in the Oxley Command – will now undergo forensics and ballistics testing.

“It’s a serious matter in so far as people that are engaging in criminal activity through the ongoing supply of prohibited drugs are arming themselves with unregistered firearms, which is a concern,” Acting Inspector Sharpe said.

“Any information in relation to firearms we take very, very seriously and we do everything we can to try and get those firearms off the streets.”

Acting Inspector Sharpe said this particular raid was a result of the public contacting Crime Stoppers.

“Those files do get actioned and, if it wasn’t for Crime Stoppers, we wouldn’t have been able to get this amount of drugs or the firearm off the street,” he said.

“It is a significant quantity of cannabis and this, combined with the raid earlier in the week, shows that if we do get information about crops being cultivated on some of our rural properties, we will respond.”

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Hills street hold-up: safety policy drives council to close Forest Rd as crest gets the cut

TOP SPOT: It’s been an accident waiting to happen, but the hilltop will be shaved off to flatten the crest on Forest Rd next week. ONE of the busiest roads linking the Forest Hills and Hills Plain residential areas with inner Tamworth will be closed for nearly a week – partly so that two metres of dirt can be lopped off a hilly crest and make the roadway safer for motorists.
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Tamworth Regional Council will close part of Forest Rd so it can do the final stage of a $2.58 million road upgrade project, this time in the stretch between the Tamworth landfill site and the roundabout at Browns Ln at Forest Hills.

The council said the full road closure decision was made on the basis of safety and cost savings against keeping one lane open while the works were undertaken.

But the gravity of the works – including cutting two metres off the top of the hill where Forest Rd reaches its highest point, and upgrading the length of the roadway – decided TRC engineers to go for the full closure.

TRC director for regional services Peter Resch said keeping part of the road open for such major works would have compromised the safety of workers and motorists, and extended the time it would take to complete the road, adding to the budgeted cost.

He said the saving in monetary terms was well over $100,000 – a saving for ratepayers that could be used elsewhere.

The council has letter dropped over 400 homes in the rural residential subdivision to alert them to the fact the road will be closed to traffic from early next Monday morning for six days until Sunday and will then reopen with one lane of traffic for about another four weeks.

“Forest Rd is a busy road with between 1500 and up to 2750 vehicles using it on any one day, so we know residents will see the impact but we’re asking them to be patient, take a different route so we can finish this road more quickly,” Mr Resch said.

“They’re going to get a you-beaut road and that to me is the issue, it’s a no-brainer. I don’t think the alternate route will be too bad – if they use Johnston St or Piper St.”

“I’d encourage them to use Johnston and Piper from Moore Creek Rd and avoid the Tribe St intersection.”

Mr Resch said the project included reducing the height of the crest and a realignment of the road approaching it to improve the line-of-sight for motorists.

It was the next step in an overall upgrade of Forest Rd, including a $280,000 reconstruction of a 600m section from Monteray St near the MET school to near Reeves Creek Bridge over Spring Creek just below the landfill.

The first stage included the new $1.3 million Reeves Creek bridge and the widening of the road there.

Mr Resch said the priority had been to fix the bridge and widen a once-narrow road, particularly when lots of trucks used the landfill and the road. The works to flatten out the top of the hill – using a scraper and big machinery – get under way Monday.

The project engineer for the job has estimated the material being moved from the two-metre “shaving” equates to digging out a football field, 68 metres by 100 metres to a depth of four metres – creating a pile of 2400 cubic metres of dirt.

Mr Resch said the fill would be used to reinforce the shoulders and batters of the road and the neighbouring mountain bike club had asked for some leftovers to be used on their tracks.

Tamworth mayor Col Murray has added his voice to the project, pleading for patience over the disruption.

In the end, the Hills residents were getting a better, safer road, he said, and that was worth a lot more than a few minutes extra travel for a few days.

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Cowboys saddle Broncs 19-18

North Queensland Cowboys captain Johnathan Thurston celebrated his 250th match for the club in grand style after nailing a 75th minute field goal which gave the Cowboys a 19-18 victory against the Brisbane Broncos in Townsville on Friday night.
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The North Queensland Cowboys got their revenge against the Brisbane Broncos with a 19-18 win in front of a packed capacity crowd at 1300SMILES Stadium in Townsville on Friday night.

It was the Cowboys who came out on top this time after their heartbreaking 21-20 loss to Brisbane back in Round 4 off a miraculous Anthony Milford kick.

Each of the last three contests between the two clubs has been decided by a single point which illustrates how evenly matched they are.

It was the sweetest of victories for Cowboys skipper Johnathan Thurston who celebrated his 250thmatch for the club by puttinghis game clinching field goal attempt throughthe uprights in the 75thminute.

But it was an excellent allround effort by the squad over the final 20 minutes that got the northerners in position for the two competition points after being put on the ropes by the Broncs for the majority of the game.

The Cowboys got off to a confident start with Matt Scott scoring off a Jake Granville assist in the 12thminute.

The home side dominated possession up untilthe 25 minute mark but the Broncos sturdy defence held up well, it was at that pointthemomentum of the match shifted with Matt Gillett brushingoff four Cowboys defenders on his way to the goal line.

A penalty goal to Jordan Kahu in the 29th minuteevenedthe score at six, which was followed byan easy second try for Gillettto give the Broncos a 12-6 lead after the Kahu conversion.

The Cowboys playedtheir worst football since their error filled performance against the Eelsin Round 2 -which resulted in a loss – from that first Gillett score up untilmidway through the second half, and the defending premiers looked set for a humbling loss.

The feeling of impending defeat only grew stronger when Kahu scored early in the second half to put the visitors ahead 16-6 which quickly became a two convertedtry margin after he successfully struck another penalty attempt.

It was when the game clock hit 58 minutes that the Cardiac Cowboys reemerged and even though he hadn’t had his best game of the yearLachlan Coote displayed some magic when it mattered after recovering his own Broncos deflected grubber to get the margin back to six after Thurston’s conversion.

Thurston then set up a rampaging Justin O’Neill for a 64th minute try with the captain’s successful conversion tying the match up.

Michael Morgan nearly sealed the game with a piece of individualbrilliance in the 70thminute but unfortunately was a finger short of grounding the ball, but Thurston’s ice cold connection soon aftersecured the win.

After playing the hero for Brisbane last time around Milford cost the Broncos a chance to go ahead when the scores were deadlocked at 18 whenhe coughedup the ball while lining up for his attempt at goal.

In the dying stages of the match he had a chance to force the game into golden pointbut his attempt saw him shank the Steeden wide right after having all the time in the world to get his eye in.

Ben Hunt also had a chance to even the scores and only narrowly missed his booming longrange shot.

The Cowboys will have to dig deep to get an away win against the Dragons on Saturday with severalplayers away trainingin preparation forOrigin Game 1.

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Highway robbery: use Bells Line of Road or pay distance-based toll on the M4

MOTORISTS travelling from the Central West to Sydney will be forced to use the Bells Line of Road or pay a toll as the government introduces a distance-based toll on the M4.
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The move will result in an increase in traffic on the notorious Bells Line of Road says Orange councillor Jeff Whitton.

Cr Whitton, travels to Sydney regularly for work and says the implementation of a toll on the M4, by the state government, was revenue-raising and left regional people out-of-pocket because the alternative route was a far more difficult road to drive on and had patches of no mobile phone reception.

“Well the Bells Line is a road, not a highway like the Great Western Highway which is designed for that type of traffic,” he said.

“A lot of people from regional centres don’t have e-tags so they will avoid the tolls and have to use the Bells Line.”

From mid-2017 motorists travelling from the Central West to Central in Sydney, via the M4 will have to pay $4.21.

The toll has been introduced to pay for the upgrade and widening of the M4 to four lanes in each direction from Church Street to Homebush Bay as part of the first stage of WestConnex.

According to a Roads and Maritime Services spokeswoman the toll charge is based on distance travelled, similar to the tolls on the M7.

“This is a fairer, more equitable system made possible by electronic tolling and ensures motorists are only paying for the roads they’re using,” she said.

“The maximum toll for the M4 widening between Church Street, Parramatta and Homebush Bay Drive, Homebush will be $4.21, with a minimum toll for travel between Silverwater Road and Hill Road of $1.63.”

The spokeswoman said all tolled roads have alternative options for motorists.

In the case of the Great Western Highway, which becomes the M4, the Bells Line of Road is the alternative.

According to the Bells Line Expressway lobbyists there are 19 speed variations on the Bells Line of Road, it has up to 26 kilometres where motorists are without a safe overtaking opportunity and the Bells Line of Road experiences around twice the typical rates of crashes as other roads in NSW.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Highway robbery: use Bells Line of Road or pay distance-based toll on the M4

MOTORISTS travelling from the Central West to Sydney will be forced to use the Bells Line of Road or pay a toll as the government introduces a distance-based toll on the M4.
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The move will result in an increase in traffic on the notorious Bells Line of Road says Orange councillor Jeff Whitton.

Cr Whitton, travels to Sydney regularly for work and says the implementation of a toll on the M4, by the state government, was revenue-raising and left regional people out-of-pocket because the alternative route was a far more difficult road to drive on and had patches of no mobile phone reception.

“Well the Bells Line is a road, not a highway like the Great Western Highway which is designed for that type of traffic,” he said.

“A lot of people from regional centres don’t have e-tags so they will avoid the tolls and have to use the Bells Line.”

From mid-2017 motorists travelling from the Central West to Central in Sydney, via the M4 will have to pay $4.21.

The toll has been introduced to pay for the upgrade and widening of the M4 to four lanes in each direction from Church Street to Homebush Bay as part of the first stage of WestConnex.

According to a Roads and Maritime Services spokeswoman the toll charge is based on distance travelled, similar to the tolls on the M7.

“This is a fairer, more equitable system made possible by electronic tolling and ensures motorists are only paying for the roads they’re using,” she said.

“The maximum toll for the M4 widening between Church Street, Parramatta and Homebush Bay Drive, Homebush will be $4.21, with a minimum toll for travel between Silverwater Road and Hill Road of $1.63.”

The spokeswoman said all tolled roads have alternative options for motorists.

In the case of the Great Western Highway, which becomes the M4, the Bells Line of Road is the alternative.

According to the Bells Line Expressway lobbyists there are 19 speed variations on the Bells Line of Road, it has up to 26 kilometres where motorists are without a safe overtaking opportunity and the Bells Line of Road experiences around twice the typical rates of crashes as other roads in NSW.

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Focus on killer’s mental state

ON TRIAL: Ian Robert Turnbull. Photo by James Alcock.
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AS HE awaited trial for the shooting murder of an environmental officer, elderly farmer Ian Turnbull told a psychiatrist he was “resolved to spending the rest of his life in jail”.

“I can’t believe what I’ve done,” the 81-year-old told Dr Adam Martin in February, 2016, a Sydney court heard on Friday.

“I’m sorry about it now, but I’m at the end of my life.”

“I’m just about buggered.”

Turnbull shot Glen Turner with a rifle several times at his Croppa Creek property north of Moree in July, 2014 amid land-clearing disputes.

The man admits killing Mr Turner but is fighting a charge of murder on the basis thathe “snapped” and lost self-control.

His Supreme Court murder trial has previously heard from a psychiatrist who claims Turnbull was suffering from major depression and wasn’t thinking rationally when he shot the 51-year-old environmental officer.

But during yesterday’s testimony, Dr Martin said it was unlikely Turnbull, who had increased his workload leading up to the shooting, would have been able to function if he suffered from a type of major depression.

He said an adjustment disorder could cause him to overreact to stressors, but doubted whether such a condition would have a significant impact on his functioning.

“He obviously understood what he had done was … wrong in the eyes of the law,” the psychiatrist said after being quizzed on evidence Turnbull went home andwaited for police after the shooting.

And the fact Turnbull did not also shoot Turner’s colleague, who allegedly pleaded with the gunman to put down his rifle, showed he had “some ability at least to make positive actions around his behaviour,” Dr Martin said.

On Thursday, treating forensic psychiatrist Professor David Greenberg told the court that his client was not thinking rationally when he shot Mr Turner.

“In his perception, he saw the world in dark-tintedglasses,” he said.

“He had a major depression, and it’s not a temporary or transient thing.”

Professor Greenberg rejected crown prosecutor Pat Barrett’s claims, saying he wasn’tsatisfied the shooting waspremeditated.

“He only developed the intention to shoot Mr Turnbull when he drove up to the laneway,” he said.

Professor Greenberg said Turnbull did not try and present himself as mentally ill, but

the brief of evidence he had collected on the farmer said otherwise.

He said Turnbull had a family history of mental illness and had been prescribed anti-depressants by his doctor after an episode in the 1970s.

His delusions on his situation were apparent, Professor Greenberg said.

“In his mind, he perceived he was ruined … he was bankrupt … that everything was over,” he said.

The trial continues before Justice Peter Johnson.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Highway robbery: use Bells Line of Road or pay distance-based toll on the M4

MOTORISTS travelling from the Central West to Sydney will be forced to use the Bells Line of Road or pay a toll as the government introduces a distance-based toll on the M4.
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The move will result in an increase in traffic on the notorious Bells Line of Road says Orange councillor Jeff Whitton.

Cr Whitton, travels to Sydney regularly for work and says the implementation of a toll on the M4, by the state government, was revenue-raising and left regional people out-of-pocket because the alternative route was a far more difficult road to drive on and had patches of no mobile phone reception.

“Well the Bells Line is a road, not a highway like the Great Western Highway which is designed for that type of traffic,” he said.

“A lot of people from regional centres don’t have e-tags so they will avoid the tolls and have to use the Bells Line.”

From mid-2017 motorists travelling from the Central West to Central in Sydney, via the M4 will have to pay $4.21.

The toll has been introduced to pay for the upgrade and widening of the M4 to four lanes in each direction from Church Street to Homebush Bay as part of the first stage of WestConnex.

According to a Roads and Maritime Services spokeswoman the toll charge is based on distance travelled, similar to the tolls on the M7.

“This is a fairer, more equitable system made possible by electronic tolling and ensures motorists are only paying for the roads they’re using,” she said.

“The maximum toll for the M4 widening between Church Street, Parramatta and Homebush Bay Drive, Homebush will be $4.21, with a minimum toll for travel between Silverwater Road and Hill Road of $1.63.”

The spokeswoman said all tolled roads have alternative options for motorists.

In the case of the Great Western Highway, which becomes the M4, the Bells Line of Road is the alternative.

According to the Bells Line Expressway lobbyists there are 19 speed variations on the Bells Line of Road, it has up to 26 kilometres where motorists are without a safe overtaking opportunity and the Bells Line of Road experiences around twice the typical rates of crashes as other roads in NSW.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.